The fact that the world has transformed from desktop computing to mobile computing means one thing: current and future applications will be mobile-based. The proliferation of mobile devices in recent times, driven mainly by growing consumer adoption of smartphones and tablets has made organizations find ways of leveraging their businesses using mobile applications.

Amidst these developments, a raging debate has been ignited on whether companies should use native, or web-based or hybrid applications. Whether these organizations would like to use the mobile applications to market their products, or push the mobile apps as their products for sale, one fact remains elusive: it’s difficult to choose whether to adopt native, the web or hybrid applications.


Let’s face it—the raging debate on which mobile development strategies to use has confused businesses. While the two mobile development strategies—native or web-based—have their fair share of merits as well their demerits, it’s important to look at the big picture when deciding on which approach to use for your business bottom line.

The demerits of each of the two mobile development strategies—native and web-based— have led organizations to try out new approaches that are more robust and flexible about the development of mobile applications. It’s no longer the case that your organization will have a single Android app.

Whether your business is small,  or medium or large, you still to have a mobile application that supports various mobile devices such as the iPad, the Amazon Kindles, the Android devices, BlackBerry devices and Windows Phone devices. Truth be told, developing mobile applications for all these devices is a major challenge for businesses, regarding costs and time.

So, how does the cross-platform mobile development fit it in to address these challenges? Keep reading.


There exists a large confusion between a mobile app and a mobile website. More often the unclear objectives lead to this uncertainty. No matter what you want, having a crystal like objective is must. A website can be just a brand representation, or go much beyond by offering even the complex services online.